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Policy 4.94
Immunization

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Responsible Official: VP for Human Resources
Administering Division/Department: Health and Safety
Effective Date: April 02, 2007
Last Revision: June 22, 2007

Policy Sections:

Overview

Individuals who are employed by Emory in health or research related positions with potential occupational exposure to communicable and vaccine preventable diseases must provide documentation of previous immunization or be tested for immunity within 10 days of employment. Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) law requires that new employees who are hired into positions in which they may have bloodborne pathogen exposure must be offered the Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Immunization within ten business days of the date they start working.

Policy Details

Hiring Official

Notifies Employment when a position may involve potential exposure to blood borne pathogens or to tuberculosis by indicating it on the Employment Requisition.

Employment
Tracks potential exposure information on posted positions by entering it into the job posting information system (Personic).

Hiring Official
For positions with potential exposure, includes the following statement in the selected candidate’s offer letter and sends the candidate a blank Immunization History Form to complete with the relevant immunizations highlighted.

Offer Letter
“Due to the potential risk of this position, you must complete the attached Immunization History Form and provide documentation of previous immunizations for the immunizations that have been highlighted. Please bring both the completed form and copies of your immunization documentation with you on the first day of work and discuss this information with your supervisor. If documentation of any of these immunizations is not available, you will be required to go to Emory’s Employee Health Services and be tested and/or immunized within your first 10 days of employment to continue working. If you do not wish to receive a vaccine, you may sign a form to decline the vaccine.”

Supervisor
For positions with potential exposure, reviews the completed Immunization History Form and required immunization documentation on the day the new employee begins work. If the Immunization History Form is complete with all required documentation, forwards the forms to the Immunization Coordinator in the Environmental Health and Safety Office.

Environmental Health & Safety Office
Enters immunization information into a centralized database.

Supervisor
If the employee does not provide the required documentation, directs the employee, with their Immunization History Form and any documentation they may have, to Employee Health Services to receive the proper immunity test or immunization(s). Employee Health Services is located at Emory University Hospital in Room HB53 or at Emory Crawford Long Hospital, Byron Building, Room 1505, 549 Peachtree Street, NE. This must be completed within 10 working days of the employee’s hire date, or the employee will not be allowed to continue to work.

Employee Health Services
Provides immunizations and assesses titers to check serological immunity when employee lacks documentation. Based on risk to employee, offers immunizations including but not limited to PPD (annually), Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR), Varicella, and Tetanus. Completes the required paperwork and enters the information into a centralized database. Emory is required to provide immunizations at no cost to employees who may have potential occupational exposures.

Required Record-Keeping
The completed Immunization History Form and related documentation will be maintained either in the University’s Environmental Health and Safety Office or in Emory’s Employee Health Services.

Environmental Health & Safety Office
The Environmental Health and Safety Office will review the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) requirements with new employees during employee orientation.

Related Links

Revision History